Category Archives: Experience Design

Interaction Criticism: How to Do It, Part 6

Four Directions in Academic Design Criticism In Part 5 of this series (which more or less begins here), I sampled writings about designs from various design magazines to show examples of ways that people write about design. In it, I … Continue reading

Posted in Aesthetics, Criticism, Experience Design, HCI, Interaction Design, philosophy, Semiotics | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Conceptual Gaps in Interaction “Design”

I’m not finished working on my multipart series, “Interaction Criticism: How to Do It,” and I’m really looking forward to the next installment, which will present and discuss some examples from “serious” design criticism (i.e., design criticism published in academic … Continue reading

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Interaction Criticism: How to Do It, Part 5

Examples and Explanations of Design Criticism Writing Last week I posted Part 4 in my series on Interaction Criticism. Since then, I have read many more examples of design criticism, and so I want to expand on what I wrote … Continue reading

Posted in Aesthetics, Criticism, Experience Design, Interaction Design, Leisure, philosophy, Politics, User-Centered Design | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Interaction Criticism: How to Do It, Part 4

Produce a Critique, Or, What and How to Write Continued from Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. I apologize that it has taken a week to resume writing in this series. Part of the problem was a very busy … Continue reading

Posted in Aesthetics, Criticism, Experience Design, HCI, Interaction Design, Writing Process | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Interaction Criticism: How to Do It, Part 3

Building a Critical Interpretation This post continues a multi-part series on interaction criticism begun here. The series goal is to offer a useful introduction to criticism in the context of interaction design, targeted at interaction design professionals. In the previous … Continue reading

Posted in Aesthetics, Criticism, Experience Design, HCI, Interaction Design, Wearable Computing | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Interaction Criticism: How to Do it, Part 2

Low-Level Interpretive Strategies, or, Things to Look For In Part 1 of this series, I covered three high-level critical strategies: thinking through associations, modeling the act of reading/interpretation, and identifying resonant passages/examples. Reading through them, I can imagine interaction design … Continue reading

Posted in Aesthetics, Criticism, Experience Design, HCI, Interaction Design | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Interaction Criticism: How to Do It, Part 1

[Update] I have converted this 7-part series to a convenient PDF. You can download it here. General Introduction In my previous post I concluded that those of us who have a foot in the two worlds of literary/art criticism and … Continue reading

Posted in Criticism, Experience Design, HCI, Interaction Design | Tagged , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Article on Web Accessibility

If you are interested in learning more about perspectives on web accessibility, you may be interested in the article Web Accessibility: A Digital Divide for Disabled People by Alison Adams and David Kreps. You can view the article by using … Continue reading

Posted in Design Process, Ethnography, Experience Design | Tagged | 2 Comments

Class Notes for Tu, 25 Mar 2008

All, I’ve posted notes from today’s lecture. You can find the notes using either of the two links below: Freemind Format (open in Freemind) XHTML Format Regards, -Bob rmolnar[at]indiana[dot]edu

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Lecture Live Blog 03.04.2008

Kengo Kuma, Tea room building as a critical act the construction of the building out of paper is a critique of human spaces and the effect of these spaces on human interaction and condition tea space is built according to … Continue reading

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